Understanding patients’needs

Understanding the needs of patients is key to patient-focused development and the basis for designing and implementing patient-engagement. So, let’s talk to the patient.

We help you understanding patient needs by a tailored mix of approaches:

  • Structured dialogue with patients and relatives by means for quantitative and qualitative interviews, online surveys and focus-groups
  • Co-creation workshops with patients/relatives
  • Liaison with patient-organizations
  • Communication with bloggers, influencers and disease-champions in social-media

Case-studies

Case Study 1: Identifying unmet needs in a population disease

Our client’s situation

Pharma-company wishes to understand the unmet needs of patients with a common disease for developing new products and services.

What was the issue?

Patient scene is poorly organized, physician-reported needs may be biased, company has almost no contacts to patients directly.

Our solution.

Analysis of social-media, interviews with patients, online-survey. Short-list of unmet needs, discussion of potential ways to address them.

Case Study 2: Providing the third component (next to physicians and payers) for the market-assessment of an in-licensing opportunity

Our client’s situation

Pharma-company evaluates portfolio extension in a rare-disease area.

What was the issue?

Opportunity is medically and legally sound. Unsure, however, if patients will accept the concept and whether it will meet their needs.

Our solution.

Assessing the unmet needs of patients and applying obtained insight to the evaluation of the in-licensing opportunity.

Case Study 3: Obtaining insight for co-creation of a Patient-Support-Program

Our client’s situation

Company developing a new medical product for patients with a rare disease. Additional services, e.g. a patient-support-program (PSP), are considered to help patients gaining access to new treatment when needed.

What was the issue?

Little if any knowledge about what kind of program elements will be helpful for patients/relatives, what would be just “nice-to-have” and what can be potentially be perceived disturbing by them.

Our solution.

Structured dialogue with patient-representatives from patient-organizations and with patients directly (by means of qualitative interviews) and their caregivers. Providing insight recommendation to client about how to create the PSP. Organizing and facilitating a co-creation workshop with patients and the company’s PSP team.

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